Monday, October 26, 2015

Monday, October 19, 2015

Monday Meet the TOCA Team: Samuel M. Harmsen, MD!


Dr. Samuel Harmsen is thrilled to be joining the outstanding physicians at The Orthopedic Clinic Association. He is fellowship trained in shoulder and elbow surgery with advanced training in complex shoulder and elbow reconstruction. Dr. Harmsen specializes in the treatment of all shoulder and elbow conditions including sports related, reconstructive, and traumatic injury. He performs arthroscopic and open surgical techniques and is uniquely skilled with reverse shoulder replacement and revision shoulder surgery. He also treats general orthopaedic trauma of the upper and lower extremities.
Dr. Harmsen was born and raised in Salt Lake City, Utah. He attended the University of Utah majoring in Japanese and Asian Studies, interrupting his studies to serve a two-year mission for his church in Japan. Prior to medical school he enjoyed several years of ski instructing at one of his favorite ski resorts, Deer Valley, UT.
Dr. Harmsen has had the opportunity to train under some of the world’s most renowned leaders in shoulder and elbow surgery. Following orthopaedic residency, he completed a complex shoulder and elbow fellowship at the San Francisco Shoulder, Elbow and Hand Clinic under Drs. Tom Norris and James Kelly. After fellowship, he extended his training by spending time with Dr. Laurent LaFosse in Annecy, France, and Dr. Pascal Boileau in Nice, France. This specialty training has helped him gain unique skills in advanced shoulder and elbow arthroscopy and reconstruction that are not widely available in Arizona.
Dr. Harmsen is very active in orthopedic research, having published and presented at a number of local, national, and international meetings. His primary area of interest is shoulder surgery, particularly in clinical results with shoulder arthroplasty. Dr. Harmsen plans to establish the Arizona Shoulder and Elbow Institute and, together with TOCA, develop a center of excellence within Arizona for shoulder and elbow research, education, and patient care.
Dr. Harmsen likes to create a professional but relaxed clinical atmosphere where everyone feels comfortable and able to ask questions freely. He wants you to leave each visit confident and encouraged. His clinical approach is centered around each patient’s individual concerns and goals. He believes that clear communication, patient education, and patient participation are vital to the success of any treatment, whether operative or non-operative.
To schedule an appointment with Dr. Harmsen please call 602-277-6211. To learn more visit: www.tocamd.com

602-277-6211
www.tocamd.com

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Hand Surgery and Breast Cancer Patients - Dr. Josh Vella

Hand Surgery and Breast Cancer Patients - Dr. Josh Vella

One of the more troublesome issues surrounding breast cancer surgery and lymph node dissection is the development of lymphedema in the arm. Traditionally these patients have been warned against having blood pressures taken, IV’s placed and surgery performed on the same side as lymph node dissection. However, recent research suggests that surgery is safe in patients who have previously had mastectomy and lymph node dissection.
A 2007 article studied 25 women who previously had mastectomy and lymph node dissection. Four of these women had a history of lymphedema. All of these patients underwent hand surgery on the same side as their lymph node dissection. There was no increased risk of infection in this group. Only 2 had a temporary worsening of their lymphedema. Of the women who never experienced lymphedema in the past, none of them developed it after hand surgery.
Another study in 1995 studied 15 women who had lymph node dissection and hand surgery. Seven of these women had a history of lymphedema. All of these women had hand surgery and none of them developed any symptoms of lymphedema after surgery.
While there is a perception, mainly among breast care nurses and breast surgeons, that hand surgery should not be performed after lymph node dissection, literature supports that it is safe. These articles suggest that hand surgery after lymph node dissection does not increase risk of developing lymphedema after surgery. Hand surgery is safe for women who have had mastectomy and lymph node dissection.
My hands helping your hands.
Josh C. Vella, M.D.

Breast J. Hershko: Safety of Elective Hand Surgery following axillary Lymph node Dissection. 2007;13(3):287-90
Ann Surg Onc. Dawson:Elective Hand Surgery in Breast Cancer patient with prior ipsilateral axillary dissection. 1995; Mar;2(2): 132-7
Ann R Coll Surg Eng: Fulford: Hand Surgery after Axillary Lymph Node clearance. 2010; Oct:92(7):573-

RECOVERY. RESULTS. RELIEF.

602-277-6211
www.tocamd.com

Monday, September 28, 2015

Men vs. Women and Musculoskeletal health:

Men vs. Women and Musculoskeletal health: differences between males and femalse extend to their bone and joint conditions.
Women in general have a higher incidence of osteoporosis-related hip fractures yet, they have a lower rate of mortality than men with the same fracture, according to a study in the June 2015 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS). In addition, doctors don’t always recognize or treat osteoporosis in men as often as inwomen.
“Male and Female Differences Matter in Musculoskeletal Disease” details the differences between how common musculoskeletal disorders manifest themselves in males versus females. The paper also underscores how important it is, for healthcare professionals to understand those differences and recognize how multiple factors can contribute to musculoskeletal conditions and injuries.
There are differences between how males and females develop several common musculoskeletal disorders:
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are 2-8 times more common in females.
Females are 5-8 times more likely than males to suffer an ACL injury in high-intensity sports like soccer and basketball that require sudden changes of motion.
Ankle sprains are twice as common in females.
Osteoarthritis of the knee is more common in females.
Metacarpal and phalangeal (finger) fractures are more common in males.
Recognition of these differences can contribute to better care of individual patients, and to a higher index of suspicion for injury for certain diagnoses such as ACL tears.

#RECOVERY.RESULTS.RELIEF.

602-277-6211
www.tocamd.com

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Listen to the Sports Medicine Radio interview - "Dox n Jox" with Dr. Dan and Dr. Haber of TOCA!

Way to Go Dr. Joseph Haber - Orthopedic Surgeon of the Hand and Wrist at TOCA! Listen to the Sports Medicine Radio interview - "Dox n Jox" with Dr. Dan and Dr. Haber of TOCA! Click the button below to listen!


You can also learn more and listen by visiting http://www.doxnjox.com/ orhttp://www.doxnjox.com/individual-guests.html.

#RECOVERY.RESULTS.RELIEF.

602-277-6211
www.tocamd.com

Congratulations to Dr. Harmsen!


Congratulations to Dr. Harmsen who has had two papers accepted for podium presentation at the 2016 AAOS annual meeting in Orlando Florida!


RECOVERY.RESULTS.RELIEF.

602-277-6211
www.tocamd.com

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Thursday Midday with Dr. Jon Zoltan: Diagnostic Ultrasound for Musculoskeletal Problems

Diagnostic Ultrasound for Musculoskeletal Problems

Everyone knows ultrasound is an imaging procedure that evaluates a mother’s fetus prior to birth. It is safe and valuable in evaluating the growing baby while still in the mother’s womb. 

Did you know this imaging technique has many other uses in medicine? With regard to bone, tendon, muscle, nerve and ligament problems, these structures can be identified and evaluated in the office at your first visit. Your doctor can accurately diagnose your condition without the need of exposing you to radiation. The procedure is painless and you do not have to make an additional appointment at another facility.
What are some common uses of the procedure?
Ultrasound images are typically used to help diagnose:
  • tendon tears, or tendinitis of the rotator cuff in the shoulder, Achilles tendon in the ankle and other tendons throughout the body.
  • muscle tears, masses or fluid collections.
  • ligament sprains or tears.
  • inflammation or fluid (effusions) within the bursae and joints.
  • early changes of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • nerve entrapments such as carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • benign and malignant soft tissue tumors.
  • ganglion cysts.
  • hernias.
  • foreign bodies in the soft tissues (such as splinters or glass)
  • dislocations of the hip in infants.
  • fluid in a painful hip joint in children.
  • neck muscle abnormalities in infants with torticollis (neck twisting).
  • soft tissue masses (lumps/bumps) in children.

How does the procedure work?
Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a sound wave strikes an object, it bounces back, or echoes. By measuring these echo waves, it is possible to determine how far away the object is as well as the object's size, shape and consistency (whether the object is solid or filled with fluid).
In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, and vessels or detect abnormal masses, such as tumors.
In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends the sound waves and receives the echoing waves. When the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves into the body. As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive microphone in the transducer records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature waves are instantly measured and displayed by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more frames of the moving pictures are typically captured as still images. Small loops of the moving real-time images may also be saved.

This diagnostic imaging is available at TOCA. Ask your TOCA physician if this procedure is right for you.

#REOCVERY.RESULTS.RELIEF.

602-277-6211
www.tocamd.com

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

TOCA Welcomes Dr. Harmsen to TOCA, October 2015!



Photos: Dr. Harmsen in Annecy, France during his visit with Dr. Lafosse

TOCA Welcomes Dr. Harmsen to TOCA, October 2015!
Dr. Samuel Harmsen is thrilled to be joining the outstanding physicians at The Orthopedic Clinic Association. He is fellowship trained in shoulder and elbow surgery with advanced training in complex shoulder and elbow reconstruction. Dr. Harmsen specializes in the treatment of all shoulder and elbow conditions including sports related, reconstructive, and traumatic injury. He performs arthroscopic and open surgical techniques and is uniquely skilled with reverse shoulder replacement and revision shoulder surgery. He also treats general orthopaedic trauma of the upper and lower extremities.
Dr. Harmsen was born and raised in Salt Lake City, Utah. He attended the University of Utah majoring in Japanese and Asian Studies, interrupting his studies to serve a two-year mission for his church in Japan. Prior to medical school he enjoyed several years of ski instructing at one of his favorite ski resorts, Deer Valley, UT.
Dr. Harmsen received his medical degree from the George Washington University School of Medicine, where he met his wife, Jill, now a practicing OBGYN in the central Phoenix area. He completed his orthopaedic residency training at the Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center and Mayo Clinic here in Phoenix.
Dr. Harmsen has had the opportunity to train under some of the world’s most renowned leaders in shoulder and elbow surgery. Following orthopaedic residency, he completed a complex shoulder and elbow fellowship at the San Francisco Shoulder, Elbow and Hand Clinic under Drs. Tom Norris and James Kelly. After fellowship, he extended his training by spending time with Dr. Laurent LaFosse in Annecy, France, and Dr. Pascal Boileau in Nice, France. This specialty training has helped him gain unique skills in advanced shoulder and elbow arthroscopy and reconstruction that are not widely available in Arizona.
Dr. Harmsen is very active in orthopedic research, having published and presented at a number of local, national, and international meetings. His primary area of interest is shoulder surgery, particularly in clinical results with shoulder arthroplasty. Dr. Harmsen plans to establish the Arizona Shoulder and Elbow Institute and, together with TOCA, develop a center of excellence within Arizona for shoulder and elbow research, education, and patient care.
Dr. Harmsen likes to create a professional but relaxed clinical atmosphere where everyone feels comfortable and able to ask questions freely. He wants you to leave each visit confident and encouraged. His clinical approach is centered around each patient’s individual concerns and goals. He believes that clear communication, patient education, and patient participation are vital to the success of any treatment, whether operative or non-operative.
Dr. Harmsen is an admitted sports enthusiast and a fan of football, basketball, and soccer. He enjoys traveling, movies, trying new foods, and avoiding rattlesnakes. He continues to enjoy skiing and many other outdoor activities that were a part of growing up in the Wasatch Mountains, including fly-fishing, golf, hiking, and camping. Above all he enjoys spending time with his wonderful wife and family. He and his wife have set out to visit every National Park together and are well on their way to accomplishing this goal.
Dr. Harmsen and his wife are happy to return to the valley to establish his practice and their home. They are very excited to be a part of the TOCA community and he is committed to providing the top quality care that has become accustom here at TOCA.


#RECOVERY.RESULTS.RELIEF.



602-277-6211

Monday, August 24, 2015

Dr. Padley was asked to speak at the Smith&Nephew




Dr. Padley was asked to speak at the Smith&Nephew Summer national sales meeting in Chicago about his experience with their new rotator cuff repair product. Earlier in the summer he was 1 of 15 surgeons from across the country who were asked to participate in the products "Limited Commercial Release". He spent time with company representatives on product usage, tips and pearls for other surgeons and gave a talk as well as question and answer period to over 300 national representatives.

#RESULTS.RECOVERY.RELIEF. 

602-277-6211

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Backpack Safety!


When you move your child's backpack after he or she drops it at the door, does it feel like it contains 40 pounds of rocks? Maybe you've noticed your child struggling to put it on, bending forward while carrying it, or complaining of tingling or numbness.

If you've been concerned about the effects that extra weight might have on your child's still-growing body, your instincts are correct.

Backpacks that are too heavy can cause a lot of problems for kids, like back and shoulder pain, and poor posture.

Did you know that according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, injuries from heavy backpacks result in more than 7,000 emergency room visits per year.  Sprains, strains, and “overuse” injuries were among the top complaints.

When selecting a backpack, look for:

- An ergonomic design
- The correct size: never wider or longer than your child's torso and never hanging more than 4 inches below the waist
- Padded back and shoulder straps
- Hip and chest belts to help transfer some of the weight to the hips and torso
- Multiple compartments to better distribute the weight
- Compression straps on the sides or bottom to stabilize the contents
- Reflective material

Backpack Safety Tips: 

– Your backpack should weigh only 15% – 20% of your total weight
– Use both shoulder straps to keep the weight of the backpack better distributed
– Tighten the straps to keep the load closer to the back
– Organize items and pack heavier things low and towards the center
– Remove items if the backpack is too heavy and only carry items necessary for the day
– Lift properly by bending at the knees when picking up a backpack

Remember: A roomy backpack may seem like a good idea, but the more space there is to fill, the more likely your child will fill it. Make sure your child uses both straps when carrying the backpack. Using one strap shifts the weight to one side and causes muscle pain and posture problems.

Help your child determine what is absolutely necessary to carry. If it's not essential, leave it at home.

#Results.Recovery.Relief. 

602-277-6211
www.tocamd.com

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

What Is a Bunion?




What Is a Bunion?
Buions are a common problem that most people experience as an unnatural, bony hump that forms at the base of the big toe where it attaches to the foot. Often, the big toe deviates toward the other toes. When this occurs, the base of the big toe pushes outward on the first metatarsal bone -- which is the bone directly behind the big toe -- forming a bunion. If this happens on the little toe and fifth metatarsal, it's called a bunionette.

Because a bunion occurs at a joint, where the toe bends in normal walking, your entire body weight rests on the bunion at each step. Bunions can be extremely painful. They're also vulnerable to excess pressure and friction from shoes and can lead to the development of calluses.

What Causes Bunions?

Foot problems typically develop in early adulthood and get worse as the foot spreads with aging. For many people, bunions run in the family. They may be just one of several problems due to weak or poor foot structure. Bunions sometimes develop with arthritis. In people with leg length discrepancies, bunions usually form in the longer leg.

Women are especially prone to developing bunions. Years of wearing tight, poorly fitting shoes -- especially high-heeled, pointed shoes -- can bring on bunions. Such shoes gradually push the foot bones into an unnatural shape.

How are bunions treated? 

Bunion treatment should always start with changing footwear to relieve symptoms and to prevent the bunion from progressing. Shoes with a wide toe-box, minimal slope, and good arch support can help relieve the bunion pain. Some people find that ice application and anti-inflammatory medications can help relieve the inflammation around the bunion.

To reduce tension on the inner part of the joint of a bunion, stretching exercises are sometimes prescribed. Depending on the structure of the foot and severity of the bunion, custom insole orthotics can slow the progression of the bunion and address underlying biomechanical causes.

Inflammation of the joint at the base of the big toe can often be relieved by a local injection of cortisone.

Bunion Treatment: When to Consider Bunion Surgery

Bunions can cause pain and difficulty wearing certain shoes. When simple treatments don't relieve your symptoms, surgery may be considered for treatment of the bunion. What are the signs that surgery may be the right treatment for your bunion?

In general, surgery is recommended only when pain from the bunion prevents a patient from wearing normal shoes.

There is a common misconception that surgical treatments for a bunion are better and quicker than non-surgical treatments. Unfortunately, patients who rush into surgery may have unrealistic expectations, and may be unsatisfied with surgery.

Patients considering bunion surgery should understand the following about surgical treatments of bunions:

Bunion Surgery Is Not Cosmetic Surgery:
Bunions may not be pretty, but cosmetic deformity is not a good reason to perform surgery. There are too many potential complications to perform a bunion surgery simply for cosmetic reasons.

Patients Must Have Realistic Expectations:
Bunion surgery can be helpful at relieving pain, but patients should not expect to have "normal" feet after surgery. In one study, a leading researcher on foot problems such as bunions, found that 1/3 of his patients could not wear the type of shoe they desired prior to surgery.

Surgery can be an excellent treatment option for patients with problems from their bunions. That said, patients must understand this is a procedure that has potential complications and a lengthy rehabilitation.

The patients who tend to be unsatisfied with bunion surgery are those patients who are having surgery done to allow them to have normal looking feet or allow them to wear slim shoes. If that sounds like your motivation, think long and hard about surgery.

#RECOVERY.RESULTS.RELIEF.


602-277-6211
www.TOCAMD.com


Thursday, July 23, 2015

TOCA Tip: How to Use Your Crutches!

TOCA Tip: How to Use Your Crutches!


If you break a bone in your leg or foot, have a procedure on your knee or lower leg, or suffer a stroke, your doctor may recommend that you use a walking aid while you are healing or recovering. Using crutches, a cane, or a walker can help keep your weight off your injured or weak leg, assist with balance, and enable you to perform your daily activities more safely.

When you are first learning to use your walking aid, you may wish to have a friend or family member nearby to help steady you and give you support. In the beginning, everything you do may seem more difficult. With just a few tips and a little practice, though, most people are able to quickly gain confidence and learn how to use a walking aid safely.

Make Your Home Safer
Making some simple safety modifications to your home can help prevent slips and falls when using your walking aid:

*Remove throw rugs, electrical cords, food spills, and anything else that may cause you to fall.

*Arrange furniture so that you have a clear pathway between rooms.

*Keep stairs clear of packages, boxes, or clutter.

*Walk only in well-lit rooms and install a nightlight along the route between your bedroom and the bathroom.

*In the bathroom, use nonslip bath mats, grab bars, a raised toilet seat, and a shower tub seat.

*Simplify your household to keep the items you need within easy reach and everything else out of the way.

*Carry things hands-free by using a backpack, fanny pack, or an apron with pockets.

Crutches:

If you are unable to bear any weight on your leg or foot, you may have to use crutches.

If your injury or surgery requires you to get around without putting any weight on your leg or foot, you may have to use crutches.

Proper Positioning:
*When standing up straight, the top of your crutches should be about 1-2 inches below your armpits.

*The hand-grips of the crutches should be even with the top of your hip line.

*Your elbows should be slightly bent when you hold the hand-grips.

*To avoid damage to the nerves and blood vessels in your armpit, your weight should rest on your hands, not on the underarm supports.

Walking:
*Lean forward slightly and put your crutches about one foot in front of you. Begin your step as if you were going to use the injured foot or leg but, instead, shift your weight to the crutches. Bring your body forward slowly between the crutches. Finish the step normally with your good leg. When your good leg is on the ground, move your crutches ahead in preparation for your next step. Always look forward, not down at your feet.

Sitting:
*To sit, back up to a sturdy chair. Put your injured foot in front of you and hold both crutches in one hand. Use the other hand to feel behind you for the seat of your chair. Slowly lower yourself into the chair. When you are seated, lean your crutches in a nearby spot. Be sure to lean them upside down—crutches tend to fall over when they are leaned on their tips.

*To stand up, inch yourself to the front of the chair. Hold both crutches in the hand on your uninjured side. Push yourself up and stand on your good leg.

Stairs:
*To walk up and down stairs with crutches, you need to be both strong and flexible. Facing the stairway, hold the handrail with one hand and tuck both crutches under your armpit on the other side. When you are going up, lead with your good foot, keeping your injured foot raised behind you. When you are going down, hold your injured foot up in front, and hop down each step on your good foot. Take it one step at a time. You may want someone to help you, at least at first. If you encounter a stairway with no handrails, use the crutches under both arms and hop up or down each step on your good leg, using more strength.

*If you feel unsteady, it may be easier to sit on each step and move up or down on your bottom. Start by sitting on the lowest step with your injured leg out in front. Hold both crutches flat against the stairs in your opposite hand. Scoot your bottom up to the next step, using your free hand and good leg for support. Face the same direction when you go down the steps in this manner.

Monday, July 20, 2015

Joint Pain During Monsoons?!

Joint Pain During Monsoons?!

Yes, your joints pain is can probably a better indicator than your local weather station, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t turn off the news or the radio just yet.

Weather-related joint pain is usually seen in patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis and most commonly affects hips, knees, elbows, shoulders and hands. The joints contain sensory nerves called baroreceptors that can detect barometric changes.  The receptors especially react when there is low barometric pressure, such as before a rain storm may occur. People with arthritic joints seem to be more sensitive to the barometric changes.

Symptoms of certain persons are influenced by weather changes but it is not predictable what type of weather changes will bother people.  It is important to realize that only symptoms such as pain and stiffness are influenced by weather. Weather cannot not cause joint damage or arthritis.  In summary, lowering barometric pressure as seen with an approaching storm or elevation of attitude, and increase in humidity can influence the development of joint pain and stiffness.

The best advice I can give to you is to be as proactive as possible –all year round, regardless of the weather. Drink plenty of water, and keep your joints active by doing non-weight bearing exercises and stretches. Omega-3 fatty acids, glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate may also be very beneficial.

#RECOVERY.RESULTS.RELIEF.

602-277-6211 * www.tocamd.com

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Dr. Burgess: Protect you and your Children from Injury this Fourth of July Holiday

Protect you and your Children from Injury this Fourth of July Holiday!



Celebrating our Independence with a Boom has been a tradition for many families for years over the July 4th Holiday season.  Unfortunately every year thousands of children and adults are needlessly injured by not following basic fireworks safety tips. With the proper respect fireworks deserve, everyone can safely enjoy the show.

Children are most frequently injured by fireworks.  Most are under the age of 15.  You may think firecrackers or other types of explosive or rocket variety fireworks are most responsible for their injuries.  In fact, the biggest risk of injury comes from sparklers.  Sparklers account for roughly 16% of all firework related injuries.  If you consider children alone, sparklers account for about 1/3 of all injuries and over half of the injuries to children under 5.

In order to prevent children from being injured by sparklers, it is important to consider following some very simple safety tips.

1.   Never let children handle, light or play with sparklers without adult supervision.
2.   Dont let your child handle or light more than one sparkler at a time.
3.   Dont pass of a lit sparkler to someone else, have them hold the unlit sparkler while you light it.
4.   Dont hold your child in your arms while you or the child is using sparklers.
5.   Keep your distance: its recommended children stay at least 6 feet apart from one another while handling sparklers.
6.   Instruct your child to hold the sparkler away from their body keeping them at arms length.
7.   Avoid waving the sparklers wildly through the air as children frequently lose hold of the sparkler causing injury to themselves or others around them.
8.   Wear proper clothing and footwear.  Many injuries occur when an burnt out sparkler is dropped on the ground causing foot burns or puncture wounds from stepping on them.
9.   Once the sparkler flame goes out, the metal rod should be dropped directly into a bucket of water.  The extinguished sparkler and metal rod remain hot for a long time.
10.         Keep your fireworks out of the reach of children.  Lock them up.  Kids are creative and can easily find a source of fire to ignite fireworks, i.e. a lit candle.


Above all, use common sense, pay attention to children, and if alcohol is involved in an adult party with children, designate someone to remain sober and responsible while any and all fireworks are in use.  Hopefully these simple tips can help you and your family avoid an unwanted trip to the emergency department, or worse yet, a permanent and disfiguring injury. 

The Hand Surgeons at TOCA, as well as the rest of the Physicians and Staff with you and your family health and happiness as we celebrate with pride, our Independence Day.

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Text Neck: Is Smartphone Use Causing Your Neck Pain?


Text Neck: Is Smartphone Use Causing Your Neck Pain?
Virtually unheard of two years ago, “text neck” is a repetitive strain injury that’s becoming more common as more people hunch over smartphones. Aggravating muscle pain in the neck and shoulders, and sometimes lower back, is occurring even in teens and adolescents.
How can using a smartphone or other mobile device cause so much hurt? It’s all in how you look at it. Literally. Looking down, dropping your head forward, changes the natural curvature of your neck. Over time, that misalignment can strain muscles and cause wear and tear on the structures of the neck.

Three things happen when you drop your head:
1. Your neck moves forward.
2. Your shoulders round forward or lift up toward your ears.
3. Your neck and shoulder muscles spasm (contract).
The hours that modern society spends in a flexed position continues to increase, with watching TV, computer use, driving and texting. We eat bent forward, drive in a flexed position, watch TV or movies in a cushioned chair that we sink into -
all pushing our spine into a flexed position. How often are we doing something in which we actually look up?

What can be done to correct these problems?
The great news is that many cases can be alleviated. A physical therapist can help. Correction involves changing the root cause of the symptoms, such as postural correction, chair change or changing driving position. This may also include stretching the chest and front of the neck, and strengthening of the upper back. Cervical traction may also help with disk-related symptoms. Soft tissue mobilization and stretches may help tight muscles relax. lt does take a lot of work to change long-term habits.

Three tricks to nix text neck
To nix text neck, improve your posture:
1. Straighten up. Learn proper posture and neck alignment by peeking at your profile in a mirror. If you’re standing correctly, you should be able to draw a vertical line from your ear to your shoulder.
2. Arch back. If your posture isn't perfect, try doing shoulder extensions. Arch your neck and upper back backward, pulling your shoulders into alignment under your ears. This simple stretch can alleviate stress and muscle pain.
3. Look forward. Rather than tilting your chin down to read your mobile device, raise the device to eye level. The same goes for your desktop computer. Your monitor screen should be at eye level so your head isn't perpetually dropping and causing muscle strain.

#RECOVERY.RESULTS.RELIEF.

602-277-6211

Thursday, June 11, 2015

X-rays, CT Scans and MRIs oh my!



One of the more common questions asked by patients is what's the difference between X-ray, CT and MRI?

Diagnostic imaging techniques help narrow the causes of an injury or illness and ensure that the diagnosis is accurate. These techniques include X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

These imaging tools let your doctor "see" inside your body to get a "picture" of your bones, organs, muscles, tendons, nerves, and cartilage. This is a way the doctor can determine if there are any abnormalities.

X-rays

X-rays (radiographs) are the most common and widely available diagnostic imaging technique. Even if you also need more sophisticated tests, you will probably get an X-ray first.

The part of your body being pictured is positioned between the X-ray machine and photographic film. You have to hold still while the machine briefly sends electromagnetic waves (radiation) through your body, exposing the film to reflect your internal structure. The level of radiation exposure from X-rays is not harmful, but your doctor will take special precautions if you are pregnant.

Bones, tumors and other dense matter appear white or light because they absorb the radiation. Less dense soft tissues and breaks in bone let radiation pass through, making these parts look darker on the X-ray film. Sometimes, to make certain organs stand out in the picture, you are asked given barium sulfate or a dye.

You will probably be X-rayed from several angles. If you have a fracture in one limb, your doctor may want a comparison X-ray of your uninjured limb. Your X-ray session will probably be finished in about 10 minutes. The images are ready quickly.

X-rays may not show as much detail as an image produced using newer, more powerful techniques.

Computed Tomography (CT)

Computed tomography (CT) is a modern imaging tool that combines X-rays with computer technology to produce a more detailed, cross-sectional image of your body. A CT scan lets your doctor see the size, shape, and position of structures that are deep inside your body, such as organs, tissues, or tumors. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before undergoing a CT scan.

You lie as motionless as possible on a table that slides into the center of the cylinder-like CT scanner. The process is painless. An X-ray tube slowly rotates around you, taking many pictures from all directions. A computer combines the images to produce a clear, two-dimensional view on a television screen.

You may need a CT scan if you have a problem with a small, bony structure or if you have severe trauma to the brain, spinal cord, chest, abdomen, or pelvis. As with a regular X-ray, sometimes you may be given barium sulfate or a dye to make certain parts of your body show up better.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is another modern diagnostic imaging technique that produces cross-sectional images of your body. Unlike CT scans, MRI works without radiation. The MRI tool uses magnetic fields and a sophisticated computer to take high-resolution pictures of your bones and soft tissues. Tell your doctor if you have implants, metal clips, or other metal objects in your body before you undergo an MRI scan.

You lie as motionless as possible on a table that slides into the tube-shaped MRI scanner. The MRI creates a magnetic field around you and then pulses radio waves to the area of your body to be pictured. The radio waves cause your tissues to resonate.

A computer records the rate at which your body's various parts (tendons, ligaments, nerves, etc.) give off these vibrations, and translates the data into a detailed, two-dimensional picture. You will not feel any pain while undergoing an MRI, but the machine may be noisy.

An MRI may help your doctor to diagnose your torn knee ligaments and cartilage, torn rotator cuffs, herniated disks, hip and pelvic problems, and other problems. An MRI may take 30 to 90 minutes.

#RECOVERY.RESULTS.RELIEF.



602-277-6211

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Dr. Evan Lederman: Named Top 20 North American Shoulder Surgeons of 2015!


Congratulations to Dr. Evan Lederman who has been named one of the Top 20 North American Shoulder Surgeons of 2015! 



Evan S. Lederman, M.D.

Dr. Lederman is an orthopedic surgeon and President of The Orthopedic Clinic Association (TOCA) in Phoenix, Arizona. He is also Chief of the Shoulder Service for the Banner Good Samaritan Orthopedic Sports Medicine Fellowship and Clinical Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Arizona. “Evan has developed innovative shoulder arthroplasty designs and techniques, excelled as a teacher of residents, fellows, and his peers, and has been a leader in his community for shoulder care.” - Orthopedics This Week: 20 of the Top North American Shoulder Surgeons: 2015 Elizabeth Hofheinz, M.P.H., M.Ed.

http://www.rushortho.com/pdf/The%2028%20Top%20North%20American%20Shoulder%20Surgeons-Orthopedics%20This%20Week.pdf

#Results.Recovery.Relief.
602-277-6211



Monday, June 1, 2015

June 1-7: Hand Therapy Week!


Happy June 1st! This week is National Hand Therapy Week. 


What is a Hand Therapist?
A hand therapist is an occupational or physical therapist who, through advanced continuing education, clinical experience and integration of knowledge in anatomy, physiology and kinesiology, has become proficient in treatment of pathological upper extremity conditions resulting from trauma, disease, congenital or acquired deformity. A hand therapist may achieve advanced certification as a certified hand therapist (CHT). To obtain the CHT credential, a therapist must practice for a minimum of five years, accumulating at least 4,000 hours of treatment for hand and upper extremity disorders. Certified hand therapists must also pass a rigorous certification exam to demonstrate their competency in the practice of hand therapy.

What is Hand Therapy?
Hand therapy is the art and science of evaluating and treating injuries and conditions of the upper extremity (shoulder, arm, elbow, forearm, wrist and hand). Hand therapy uses a number of therapeutic interventions to help return a person to their highest level of function. It evolved from the need for a specialist with the knowledge and experience required to manage the challenging recovery of complex hand and upper extremity injuries 

What Can a Hand Therapist Do for Me?
Hand therapists bridge the gap from medical management of upper extremity conditions to successful recovery, allowing individuals to function normally in their daily lives. Hand therapists provide non-operative interventions, preventative care and post-surgical rehabilitation for a wide variety of upper extremity disorders, from simple fingertip injuries to complex replanted extremities. Patients with chronic conditions, such as arthritis, or neurologic conditions, such as a stroke, can benefit from hand therapy through education on joint protection and energy conservation, and with recommendations for adaptive equipment or devices to improve function. A hand therapist employs a variety of techniques and tools, including activity and exercise programs, custom orthotic fabrication, management of pain and swelling and wound and scar care. A hand therapist can also be a consultant in the industrial world, training employees in healthy work habits.


Hand Therapy at TOCA

The TOCA Upper Extremity and Hand Therapists (Certified Hand Therapists) provide services that improve function, increase motion, relieve pain, increase independence in activities of daily living, increase strength and dexterity for return to home, sports or work.

TOCA's Hand Therapists work with individuals of all ages with a variety of injuries or conditions. Their areas of expertise involve evaluation, treatment and custom splinting of the shoulder, elbow, forearm, wrist, hand and fingers.

Hand Therapy is a type of rehabilitation performed by an occupational or physical therapist on patients with conditions affecting the hands and upper extremities. Such therapy is performed by a provider with a high degree of specialization that requires continuing education, and often advanced certification. This enables the hand therapist to work with patients to hasten their return to a productive lifestyle.

To find a TOCA Hand Therapist near you call 602-277-6211 or visit: http://tocamd.com/HandTherapyatTOCA.html


#Results.Recovery.Relief.




602-277-6211
www.TOCAMD.com

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Wednesday Workout Tips!


Wednesday Workout Tips:
  1. Be Consistent.
  2. Follow an Effective Exercise Routine: The American Council on Exercise (ACE) recently surveyed 1,000 ACE-certified personal trainers about the best techniques to get fit. Their top three suggestions:
    1. Strength training - Even 20 minutes a day twice a week will help tone the entire body
    2. Interval training.
    3. Increased cardio/aerobic exercise.
  3. Set Realistic Goals: Don't strive for perfection or an improbable goal that can't be met, focus instead on increasing healthy behaviors
  4. Use the Buddy System: Find a friend or relative whom you like and trust who also wants to establish a healthier lifestyle
  5. Make Your Plan Fit Your Life: Too busy to get to the gym? If you've got floor space, try simple floor exercises to target areas such as the hips and buttocks, legs and thighs, and chest and arms (like push-ups, squats, and lunges). Aim for 10-12 repetitions of each exercise, adding more reps and intensity as you build strength.
  6. Be Happy: Be sure to pick an activity you actually enjoy doing, And choose something that is convenient. Rock climbing may be a great workout, but if you live in a city, it's not something you'll be doing every day.
  7. Watch the Clock: Your body clock, that is. Try to work out at the time you have the most energy. If you're a morning person, schedule your fitness activities early in the day; if you perk up as the day goes along, plan your activities in the afternoon or evening.
  8. Call In the Pros: Especially if you're first getting started. By getting a professional assessment, you can determine your weakest links and focus on them. This will improve your overall fitness balance.
  9. Get Inspired: Fitness is a state of mind. One trick to get and stay motivated is to read blogs or web sites that show him how others have been successful, ask "Who inspires you?"
  10. Be Patient: Finally, remember that even if you follow all these tips, there will be ups and downs, setbacks and victories. Hang in there, and you'll see solid results

#RESULTS.RECOVERY.RELIEF.


(The Orthopedic Clinic Association)
602-277-6211